To Life! L'Chaim!
We Are The Jewish Wedding Experts!

We Specialize in Jewish Weddings

We fully understand all of the Traditional Jewish wedding rituals and customs. Not only are we familiar with them, but we also specialize in all types of Jewish weddings (Orthodox, Conservative, Reform & even Interfaith). No matter if you are having an mixed marriage with half the guests Jewish, and half Non-Jewish, or if you and your families are very religious and are keeping to tradition (ore using your own interpretations), we are ready to help and guide you from start to finish.

The Celebration!

No Jewish wedding is complete without the Hora, or chair dance, most likely derived from the tradition of carrying royalty on chairs. A few strong and brave guests hoist the bride and groom high above the crowd on chairs to the infectious sounds of energetic klezmer music. Friends and family dance around in an ecstatic circle as the elevated couple tries not to look (or fall) down.

We are often asked how we can get different people of different backgrounds, nationalities, cultures, and religions to come together and all take part in the festivities. Our DJs are skilled for situations just like this. The power of music is contagious. You will find that your guests not only take part in these moments, but also develop a connection to whats happening and really enjoy every minute.

The Most Common Jewish Wedding Components & Traditions

Chattan’s Tisch

The groom's reception, called the Chattan’s Tisch takes place in a separate room, attended by the men. Here, the Ketubah (marriage contract) and Tna’im (wedding contract) are signed. The couple's mothers will participate by breaking a plate, representing a shift in responsibility, as they begin their new life together.

Bedeken (veiling)

The bride is escorted into a room, where guests can greet her. The groom then enters the room and places the veil over her face. This tradition originates with Jacob who unknowlingly married Leah instead of Rachel, because he could not see through her veil. The bride is then blessed by her father.

The Chuppah

The ceremony takes place under a chuppah (canopy) symbolic of the home that the newly married couple will build together. The groom wears a kittel, a white garment traditionally worn on Yom Kippur, to represent the spiritual holiness of the ceremony. The brides parents will escort her to the base of the chuppah, where the groom comes down to escort her, as they enter the chuppah as a couple. Once there, the bride will circle the groom seven times alluding to the days of creation. Through this ritual, the couple create their own new world.

Chuppah Ceremony

The first part of the ceremony, the Erusin (betrothal), begins with a blessing over wine. Then the groom will place a ring on the bride's forefinger and recite a few words. The bride also presents the groom with a ring as a token of her love. The ketubah is read and handed to the groom, who presents it to the bride. The ceremony continues with the Nisuin (marriage) and the sheva brachot (seven blessings). These seven blessings will be read in hebrew and in english. They express the hope that the couple will have a joyous life together.

Mazel Tov!

The ceremony concludes as the groom breaks a glass with his foot. In doing so, we remember the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem even during our happiest moments. Immediately following the ceremony, the bride and groom are escorted to the Yichud room to share the first moments of marriage alone.

Your Wedding. Our Experience.

We will help guide you to make sure that your wedding contains the elements you want, while still respecting your families.
We know how to make all of your guests feel like they are part of whats happening even if they have never been to a Jewish Wedding.
We can provide music and sound for your all parts of the day including the ceremony, cocktail hour, and reception.
We have a large assortment of Jewish, Israeli, Klezmer, and other traditional music to add to your wedding day's soundtrack.